Resource Library

Healthy Air Training

Medical Advocates for Healthy Air supplements medical and health education programs with specialized training on the health impacts of air pollution and climate change. This training is delivered to medical residency programs at Levine Children’s Hospital and Duke University Medical Center, at grand rounds and AHEC (Area Health Education Center) events, and other venues. It helps professionals understand the composition and sources of air pollution, the health outcomes and opportunities for anticipatory guidance, and solutions and advocacy actions where MAHA members can make an impact.

Resident Training:

CME/CEU-certified presentations and Trainings:

  • Particle Pollution and Your Patients’ Health, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    • Evidence-based Training for Healthcare Professionals. This course is designed for family medicine physicians, internists, pediatricians, occupational and rehabilitation physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, asthma educators, pulmonary specialists, cardiologists, and other medical professionals.
  • Climate Change & Health, East Carolina University
  • Clearing the Air: Protecting Your Patients from Air Pollution, Charlotte Area Health Education Center
    • Learn how air pollution affects your patients’ health, and how you can help protect your patients from the dangers of exposure to air pollution.

To schedule a presentation, please contact us.

Protecting Patient Health

Certain patients are more vulnerable to adverse impacts of exposure to air pollution. These include:

  • Children
  • Pregnant Women
  • People with respiratory illnesses, including allergies
  • People with cardiovascular disease
  • Psychiatric patients
  • Outdoor workers
  • Athletes who train or compete outdoors
  • African Americans
  • People from low-income communities
  • Elderly patients

Anticipatory guidance is an important tool for helping these patients avoid exposure to air pollution. Advice can include:

  • Following the Air Quality Index
  • Reduce outdoor activity level when AQI is high
  • Avoid wood burning – including single burn-rate wood stoves and pre-2016 wood-fired forced air furnaces
  • Close vents in cars in traffic
  • Use HEPA air filters

The EPA and the CDC have a number of fact sheets, brochures, apps and websites that can help inform you and your patients about how to avoid unhealthy air.

Air Quality Index

The Air Quality Index is one of the most important tools for reducing exposure to air pollution. This index reports daily air quality and what associated health effects might be a concern. You can obtain posters and handouts of the color codes from the NC Division of Air Quality. You and your patients can get the forecast air quality for today and tomorrow sent to your email each day, and you can check it through apps online and on your phone.

Advocacy Training

In partnership with Moms Clean Air Force and Mothers & Others for Clean Air, MAHA has developed trainings on working with the media and with state legislators.